• Zagorath@aussie.zone
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    1 month ago

    I doubt it’ll actually end up happening, but the mere fact that it’s not entirely unreasonable to talk about the idea that the LibDems will end up being the official Opposition is absolutely delightful to me, as an outsider looking in.

    • gnutrino@programming.dev
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      1 month ago

      The fact that it’s not entirely unreasonable to talk about the idea that Reform will end up being the official opposition (either by winning seats or more likely a post election coup of the Tory party) is terrifying to me as a Brit…

      • Womble@lemmy.world
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        1 month ago

        Reform are not going to win the second most seats, the most like numbers are 0-2 with it almost certainly being less than 10. That said the posibility of a hostile takeover if the tories do drop down to third place is definitely plausible. I’d like to think in that event it just dooms the tories further (we dont have the level of religious crazies over here to form a Trump-esque cult, just look at how quick the shine wore off Johnson) but it might not, and that is terrifying.

      • frog 🐸@beehaw.org
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        1 month ago

        While I can see Reform performing a coup of the Tory party, they would only successfully do so if the Tories had lost so many MPs that they were already the third largest party. Or so close to it that it would only take a few One Nation types going “nope, I’m defecting to the Lib Dems rather than join Reform” to make them the third largest party.

      • Zagorath@aussie.zone
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        1 month ago

        Maybe, but at least looking from the outside I think that’s a lot less reasonable than LibDems taking 2nd place. Reform seems more likely to take votes away from Conservatives, but not enough to gain a large number of seats. Basically, they’ll play spoiler thanks to the undemocratic FPTP voting system, but Labour and LibDems will benefit the most from that. (Which is hilarious, considering how much FPTP has unfairly helped out the Conservatives over the last few elections. Maybe after this yous can finally get a bipartisan consensus in favour of switching to a real democracy.)

        • Rogue
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          1 month ago

          Labour would never switch from FPTP. This election is showing just how much they benefit from it too

      • jabjoe
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        1 month ago

        What concerns me is if they merge before the election.

        The ballet papers have been printed. Yet one candidate would no longer be running. Is one regarded as wasted or both counted? Would those running the event remove the option when you sign? How the one nation Conservatives finally give up on their old party? Would their voters?

  • HumanPenguin
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    1 month ago

    Sorta surprised no one has compared a G7 summit. Where nothing much can happen due to coming elections.

    To his parties commitment to D Day. Seems clear Risky Sunk gaining one last chance, to talk to the world most wealthy world leaders. Before he looks for a job.

    Was way more important to his campaign team. Then taking the last chance to morn d day victims with people who actually experienced the day.

    Bo members of his team scheduled a short interview today?

  • AutoTL;DR@lemmings.worldB
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    1 month ago

    This is the best summary I could come up with:


    The Conservative on-the-ground election campaign is descending into “disarray” amid a chronic lack of volunteers and strategy and an increasing sense of panic in formerly ultra-safe seats, insiders and opponents have told the Guardian.

    Some areas have struggled to muster people to knock on doors and deliver leaflets due to a combination of a shrinking and ageing membership, a calamitous fall in the number of Conservative councillors and disillusionment with the election campaign.

    Instead the party has become heavily reliant on using paid-for delivery to send out large numbers of election leaflets that are often nationally focused and less relevant to local issues.

    One factor that might save some Tory MPs is the fact that in constituencies Labour and the Lib Dems had previously assumed were unwinnable, people who want to vote tactically are unsure who is the main contender.

    In some areas the Conservatives are trying to frame this to their advantage, putting out leaflets, for example, saying Labour is their primary opponent when it is the Lib Dems who have the better chance of unseating them.

    “The MP here has never had to work very hard to win votes and it shows,” one Lib Dem candidate in a prosperous English heartland constituency said.


    The original article contains 712 words, the summary contains 205 words. Saved 71%. I’m a bot and I’m open source!